Unbelievable

On Wednesday, the word “unbelievable” passed my lips for about the 250th time since January 20th. This was not said to express a positive “wow.”  Surprisingly, it wasn’t uttered due to something Biden or his sidekick Harris said or signed.

Thus far, the puppet Biden’s actions have made me teeth-gritting angry (my dentist will benefit), but they have not made me truly fearful. All the posturing of the dog and pony attempted “impeachment” of a private citizen,  the threats to take everyone’s AR’s (and any magazine that holds more than 10 rounds), or the talk of Trump supporters needing “reprogramming” scared me. Why? Because I know America will not allow it.

As of Wednesday morning, I can no longer say that my “fear meter” has not spiked. That occurred as I read the following article:

Democrat’s Blue Dog Coalition Endorses Legislation to Combat Domestic Threats

 

Before I read the article, my thought was, “If the Blue Dogs endorsed it, it wouldn’t be that bad.” Did I ever underestimate! It appears that not only the “Liberal Progressive” Democrats have jumped off the cliff. The Blue Dogs all joined hands and jumped as well.

“Democrats say they want to prevent those who participated in the breach of the Capitol and members of the QAnon conspiracy movement to be barred from obtaining a federal security clearance and to bolster the ability of federal law enforcement agencies to investigate and report on domestic terror threats.”

If that statement doesn’t send real fear down your spine, nothing will. The pieces are coming together, folks. If you stood by while FB, Twitter, and others, banned groups and individuals because of their political views thinking, “it doesn’t concern me, I don’t write anything about politics, and I’m not a White Supremacist,” guess again.

Let me introduce you to the bills endorsed by members of the Blue Dog Coalition. The devil is in the details:

H.R.350 – Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act of 2021

H.R.353 – Security Clearance Improvement Act of 2021

I will not be writing about H.R. 353  here. Please read it!

H.R. 350, The Domestic Terrorism Prevention Act sounds good on the surface:

“To authorize dedicated domestic terrorism offices within the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to analyze and monitor domestic terrorist activity and require the Federal Government to take steps to prevent domestic terrorism.”

 

Who wouldn’t want domestic terrorist activity analyzed, right? If someone is suspected of planning an attack, we want them investigated, monitored, and stopped. We do not want another Boston Marathon Bombing.  If folks are rioting, looting, and burning cities down, we want them stopped. If a group of people (or person) is planning to attack people in their church, school, or synagogue, they absolutely must be stopped. That makes perfect sense. Then, I read on.

“HATE CRIMES.—In compiling a joint report under this subsection, the domestic terrorism offices authorized under paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) of subsection (a) shall, in consultation with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the Civil Rights Unit of the Federal Bureau of In- vestigation, review each hate crime incident reported during the preceding 6 months to determine whether the incident also constitutes a domestic terrorism-re- lated incident.”

Wait, what? Not that I remotely agree with committing a hate crime, but we have seen crimes labeled as being a hate crime, in which the charge of “hate crime” ended up being the crime that wasn’t.

Jussie Smollett is the most famous example of an allegation which resulted in someone being charged with a crime being racially motivated (hate crime) when it wasn’t. Of course, in his case, he wasn’t the victim of a crime at all.

Judge throws out hate-crime charge in U.Md. murder trial

Sean Urbanski, a white man who murdered a black male. In addition to first-degree murder,  prosecutors charged him with a hate crime because he had racist memes on his phone and belonged to a racist FB group. They added a hate crime charge because of his membership in a group and memes on his phone. There was no evidence he posted violent comments or wished anyone harm. There was no evidence he spoke racial slurs. He was charged because of a meme someone sent him and a group he was in.

The FBI defines a hate crime as “A criminal offense against a person or property motivated in whole or in part by an offender’s bias against a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, or gender identity.”

Was Mr. Urbanski a racist? Probably. Does he deserve to spend the rest of his life in prison for murder? Absolutely. However, there is no evidence that the murder was committed because the victim was black. So, did he commit a hate crime? No.

Fortunately,  a judge agreed, and the hate crime charge was thrown out. Imagine if he didn’t go before a judge that followed the legal criteria of what the charge required. He could then have been convicted of first-degree murder with special circumstances. Thus, he would have been eligible for the death penalty.

Regardless of whether you believe a first-degree murder conviction alone should be eligible for the death penalty, it wasn’t. Charging someone with a crime they not only did not commit, but the charge doesn’t even fit the charge’s legal criteria is not only wrong. It violates every principle of our legal system. We are not a banana republic.  God willing, we never will be. We can not stand for people deliberately being charged with crimes when the act committed doesn’t fit the legal criteria. Murderer or not.

“Though Urbanski had racist memes on his phone, prosecutors hadn’t presented any evidence or testimony that he had uttered any racist comments or that he had ever advocated violence against anyone, the judge said. The fact that Urbanski had racist memes on his phone “shows some evidence of the defendant’s ideology,” the judge said, but he ruled that prosecutors hadn’t shown it was actually the motive for Collins’ killing.”

 

These are not unique stories. You won’t find many on Google (go figure) but use other search engines, and they do. Prosecutors are now charging folks with a hate crime simply because of a meme on their phone or a group they are in on FB. Apparently, just being IN a group that promotes racism with no record of you saying anything promoting violence or uttering any racial slurs during the crime you committed can still earn you a hate crime charge.

Let’s revisit H.R. 350 now:

“Democrats say they want to prevent those who participated in the breach of the Capitol and members of the QAnon conspiracy movement to be barred from obtaining a federal security clearance and to bolster the ability of federal law enforcement agencies to investigate and report on domestic terror threats.”

Do you find yourself more concerned with the wording “and member of the QAnon Conspiracy movement” and “bolster the ability of federal law enforcement agencies to investigate and report on domestic terror threats?”

There is more. Hate crimes are also buried in H.R. 350:

“HATE CRIMES.—In compiling a joint report under this subsection, the domestic terrorism offices authorized under paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) of subsection (a) shall, in consultation with the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice and the Civil Rights Unit of the Federal Bureau of In- vestigation, review each hate crime incident reported during the preceding 6 months to determine whether the incident also constitutes a domestic terrorism-re- lated incident.”

Imagine this; You were in a bar, had a little too much, someone got mouthy, and you threw a punch. Unfortunately, you also chose to use a racial slur against the man in the turban with which you had the issue. If H.R. 350 passes, not only will you be facing assault and hate crime charges, but you could also be charged as a domestic terrorist.

As if all of that wasn’t enough, there’s another problem that H.R. 350 will cause.  Of course, the verbiage is included about the FBI reporting all investigations to Congress in a regular report. Even if you are not charged with Domestic Terrorism, they included a nifty trap in there. In the report, they want detailed information on every arrest, indictment, prosecution, and conviction then;

“CLASSIFICATION AND PUBLIC RELEASE.— Each report submitted under paragraph (1) shall be—(A) unclassified, to the greatest extent possible, with a classified annex only if necessary; and (B) in the case of the unclassified portion of the report, posted on the public websites of the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.”

Even if they don’t release your name, anyone can dig into a detailed publically reported crime and piece together all the details. Especially when details include dates, times, race, and the particulars of the crime/potential  Remember, the reports are for every arrest,  indictment, prosecution, and conviction. Arrested and released? Your arrest details are all in the report. Arrested, indicted, but the case was dropped? Your arrest and indictment are in the report. Brought to trial but found innocent? You guessed it, and all the details are in the report.

Imagine what a reporter could piece together. Or a vengeful ex anything.  This information could be revealed to a prospective employer or professional licensing board doing a detailed background investigation even if you are never tried or convicted.  With the reports being made public information, irreparable damage could be done to innocent people.  Who is going to hire someone who was once charged with domestic terrorism??? You wouldn’t get called back for the final interview once the background investigation was completed. How do you think being charged as a Domestic Terrorist will affect your future travel plans? Being granted a passport? If H.R. 350 is passed, your life, reputation, and very livelihood could be destroyed if you are merely arrested and then released. 

Do you think that this will never impact you as your a law-abiding citizen, so you don’t need to worry about it? I’m sure that every person that has ever been falsely accused and arrested for a crime thought the same.

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